Have you ever been to a simcha?  A simcha is a celebration.  So if you have ever been to a wedding, birthday party, bar mitzvah, or any other celebration, you've been to a simcha.  There is a Jewish Holy Day called Simchat Torah.  It celebrates the finishing of the reading of the Torah, and it occurs on the last day of the Feast of Tabernacles, also known as Sukkot.  The reading of the torah begins again the day after Sukkot ends. This is Simchat Torah.

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The third holy convocation of the High Holy Days is Sukkot, also known as the Feast of Tabernacles, or the Feast of Booths.  Since this feast was often associated with the fall harvest it is also referred to in the Bible as the Feast of Ingathering.  The biblical roots for this feast is in the commandment that God gave to Moses found in Lev 23:42, 43 and Deut 16:12-15.

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As with each of the other Fall Holy Days, with Sukkot we look forward with eager anticipation to the future fulfillment of this Feast.

While exiled on the island of Patmos, the aged apostle Yochanan received the following revelation about the age of come:

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From night one of the festival of Sukkot, when that first meal is enjoyed with family and friends; to each succeeding night when the lulav is waved and Praise Psalms chanted; to the Feast's finale with Shmini Atzeret and Simchat Torah,  the prevailing tone of the Holiday is one of JOY!

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Many non-Jews are familiar with Passover, Chanukah, and the High Holy Day days of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.  But few non-Jews know about, and many Jews have forgotten, an equally important Holy Day, Sukkot.  It is really the third of the High Holy Days and it is the seventh of the Biblical feasts.  Sukkot also lasts seven days.  Both the numbers three and seven are significant numbers in the Bible indicating that Sukkot is important.

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